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Archive for August, 2013

Daughter Cell release date delayed to September 15th

August 29, 2013 Leave a comment

Major Announcement: My publisher, Damnation Books, has encountered some production issues and is pushing back the release date for Daughter Cell two weeks to September 15th. I repeat, the book will not be available from booksellers or from the publisher until September 15th. I apologize for making you wait. Please tell your friends.

On the other hand, I am lining up several interviews and guest blogs in the month of September. Watch this space for news as it develops. Thank you.

Categories: Writing

New five-star review posted for The Chosen

August 29, 2013 Leave a comment

Actor and storyteller par excellance Jeffrey Weissman has posted a five-star review of The Chosen. Thank you, Jeffrey! I’m glad you enjoyed the book.

Jay Hartlove’s written a very engaging and thought provoking tale of a clash of wills of biblical proportions, invested with the supernatural, the esoteric, rich in scholarship of Haitian, Egyptian and Greek cultures, it is thought provoking, a fast furious and fascinating work that leaves a lasting impression. ‘Can’t wait for the sequel!

http://www.amazon.com/review/RT0NPBPO8MMZA/ref=cm_cr_dp_title?ie=UTF8&ASIN=B00533VSX2&m=AG56TWVU5XWC2&nodeID=283155&store=books

Categories: Writing

Daughter Cell release date moved to September 15th

August 29, 2013 Leave a comment

Major Announcement: My publisher, Damnation Books, has encountered some production issues and is pushing back the release date for Daughter Cell two weeks to September 15th. I repeat, the book will not be available from booksellers or from the publisher until September 15th. I apologize for making you wait. Please tell your friends.

On the other hand, I am lining up several interviews and guest blogs in the month of September. Watch this space for news as it develops. Thank you.

Categories: Writing

Web site being updated for debut of Daughter Cell

August 27, 2013 Leave a comment

The always brilliant B.E. Johnson is updating http://www.jaywrites.com for the debut of Daughter Cell. The site has been rebranded as The Isis Rising Trilogy. There will be more interactive graphics and more research revealed. Check it out!

Categories: Writing

The first pre-release review of Daughter Cell

August 24, 2013 Leave a comment

When is a sequel not quite a sequel? Answer: When an author is confident enough to take his characters in a whole new direction, despite setting a high bar in his first offering.
In his second full-length novel, Daughter Cell, suspense author Jay Hartlove masters this delicate balancing act by delivering us back to the world of psychologist Sanantha Mawaud, but (for the most part) without bringing back the supernatural element that played such a large role in Hartlove’s first novel, The Chosen.
This time, our setting is Malaysia, Sammael and his machinations have been defeated and Sanantha is caught in a high stakes, high concept medical thriller as she seeks to help a brilliant biologist named Randy Macklin sort out a mysterious, months-long memory lapse apparently brought on by the traumatic events surrounding his wife’s death in a car accident.
Macklin comes to Mawaud with his life in tatters: his wife is dead, his daughter lies in a coma and his memory of all the events leading up his present condition is gone. And that’s just the beginning of the twists and turns that Hartlove takes us through before the full secrets of Daughter Cell are revealed.
As with The Chosen, Hartlove delivers on the tension in Daughter Cell. Fans of his first novel will be pleased to find that the narrative runs the reader through a rampage of deceit, double-crossing and the darker side of human motivation in the same fashion as before. His premise and background research in Daughter Cell are both top notch, no mean feat given the difference in theme from his first offering. And again, the blending of history, culture and various spiritual traditions that make up his character’s backgrounds shows the author’s ability to deliver those little details that makes a good story that much richer and satisfying.
Hartlove’s returning readers may feel a little disconcerted that he doesn’t return us to the fabulous world he created in The Chosen. There were a few moments that I felt the wistful pull for Charles Redmond and his fabulously imagined world of outright insanity. But despite the fact that the stakes in Daughter Cell are less grand and more personal, Hartlove still manages to bind the story together with his sharp eye (and ear) for character, tight plotting and intricate theme.
Daughter Cell makes the case that Jay Hartlove is not just a writer who works well with the supernatural, but is an up-and-coming author to watch in the thriller trade.

Jason M. Stewart
http://www.criticstudio.com

Categories: Writing

Another Five-Star Review of The Chosen

August 22, 2013 Leave a comment

http://www.amazon.com/review/R3SG1XV95ZAUSK/ref=cm_cr_dp_title?ie=UTF8&ASIN=B00533VSX2&m=AG56TWVU5XWC2&nodeID=283155&store=books

“What looks on the surface to be a shoot ’em up thriller with demons and magic turns out to be a really insightful exploration of redemption and courage.”

Categories: Writing

Intended Audience

August 18, 2013 Leave a comment

On the eve of the release of my second published novel, some thoughts about intended audience.

The literary world is abuzz with how adults are reading more and more books written for the Young Adult audience. Folks are wondering if it’s because harried, overworked, stressed out adults don’t want to work very hard at their entertainment. Maybe the storylines in YA novels resonate with architypes t…hat remind adult readers of the simple truths of good storytelling. Or maybe YA novels take adults back to feel what it was like to be a teenager again.

I will let the armchair sociologists and frustrated deconstructionists argue the why. All this speculation has focused me on the what: what makes a YA story a YA story?

Looking over the books, and the TV shows and movies, that appeal to the 12 to 17 year old set, I see two major recurring themes, 1) the child protagonist(s) discover some secret they must keep away from the adults in their lives, and 2) the child protagonist(s) try to tell the adults in their lives some truth they have discovered but the adults won’t believe them. Both of these these scenarios happen to teenagers in the real world all the time, or at least it seems that way to them dealing with parents and teachers. So it’s pretty easy to see why they would identify with protagonists who live out these patterns in fiction.

The first novel I wrote (but did not publish) was a YA fantasy of the must-keep-a-secret variety. My teenaged protagonist had a terrible time keeping his secret, and by page 100 he had a group of trusted adults around him who helped him keep it. Something about the inherent dishonesty of living a lie bothered me enough that I moved the story away from keeping the secret and onto what could he do with the power that secret gave him.

So now I write stories where the people who keep secrets are the bad guys. I also write stories where the players are all adults, and if someone treats someone badly it is because of the deadlier sins like greed, envy, and lust, as opposed to the teenaged fears of being caught or not being believed. Because I don’t expect, nor want, teenagers to think my books are for them, I make my protagonists at least 25 years old, and often closer to 50. If a teenager is mature enough to understand the themes I deal in, like redemption, revenge, loss, and forgiveness, and the actions of adults treating each other badly, then they are certainly welcome to wade in. A lot of my stuff would get an MPAA rating of R.

With a lot of adult readers enjoying YA novels (and TV and movies), I may be limiting my audience by focusing on grown ups dealing with grown up problems. But these are the stories I have to tell. Folks tell me I’m pretty good at telling these stories, so I’m going to stick with it. I will let the authors who have figured out how to write good YA do their job, and I’ll do mine.

Happy reading!

Categories: Writing
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